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at that morning star next to the crescent moon. i thought kober. the connecticut regiment would have seen that here in brooklyn getting ready to go to white plains and again, it's dopey at least when i do it but suddenly it's that raw moment where wow, we are all tiny things. >> you talked about in your book how different areas have different revolutions but it's the same revolution but they go at it from different ways. one of the constants of the american revolution seems to be people's perceptions of washington and i'm just wondering, you stay away from the big figures and put the spotlight where it belongs on the landscape of the small people, but washington is a figure in your vote. do you come to any conclusions about this man? do come away liking him or not liking him? >> probably i mean -- >> you say he did and when the revolution. he managed not to lose up what to think is a great line. >> i think is a genius stroke. -had great conversations with artists about the revolution and there is this idea that art and ritual and reenactment, the things we used to engage with our past so
, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned to build an international banking dynasty that would rival the rothschilds and baring brothers, and he did. i mean, over the next 80 years, the morgan bank--especially in america--rothschild didn't really see what america was going to be. they had one man, august belmont, who was very good. but junius morgan staked the future on his son and on america. he was very, very supervisory and censorious and critical of his son, and determined that his son was going to be sort of an upright man with a solid-gold reputation. and pierpont was not--he was not following in the paternal footsteps early on. he was much more likely to take r
. the presiding officer: the senior senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i guess the good news is that i'm rising today not to speak about the fiscal cliff, but what i'm speaking about is not good news because it deals with the tragic events that occurred in benghazi, libya, on september 11 when terrorists took the lives of our ambassador chris stevens and three other brave americans who were serving us there. mr. president, i rise today along with the ranking member of the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, senator collins, to submit for the record the report that she and i have been working on with our staffs and other members of the committee following those events in libya. we called this report flashing red, a specialist report on the terrorist attack in benghazi. flashing red was a term that was used in conversation with us by an official of the state department, and it couldn't have been more correct. all the evidence was flashing red that we had put american personnel in benghazi in an increasingly dangerous situation
's okay because in the middle of the night, there's this soldier from connecticut who was dumbing down help across the delaware, and will reach up and see this guy with a right to stick his arm out and grab him from his white horse. he told all his buddies this guys with this. leadership at all these elements. but anyway, washington's weaknesses make him just so much more brilliant. longmore, it should be noted, was a big activist in the handicapped rights movement, and i realized after i read this bugaboo, the kind of book where you're calling a to come and sing listen to this, listen to this. and i realized that he had typed the entire book -- [inaudible] and he had worked for disabled rights, and he, i him give a speech on video after i rea reae book but i realize hittite this, and he was giving a speech at another disabled rights, a memorial for another disabled rights person died and longmore said basically that this guy, you know, the movement made this great new. >> wanted to footnotes in the book made me read another book, which i hate reading books. but much more important we
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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